A Study Of Feminine Beauty

This is a blog to celebrate women and their timeless beauty. For too long have we all seen the media only ever display this odd, edited and posed idea of woman. Now this has gotten to us in the past, but as we surf through Tumblr we all see these set up, edited images. Here we are looking at the spontaneous images, especially of those feminine and glamours old time starlets and of those today who continue the timeless style of curves and the hourglass figure. We love submissions, send them here: http://hourglass-inspiration.tumblr.com/submit And this is us, give us a visit if you are interested: http://lovescakelikeafatkidlovescake.tumblr.com/ http://librocubicularist.tumblr.com/

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novocainelipstick:

Maura Monti & Gilda Miriós in Santo vs la Invasion de los Marcianos (1967)

novocainelipstick:

Maura Monti & Gilda Miriós in Santo vs la Invasion de los Marcianos (1967)


Elsie, 15, and Rose Hendon with Mary Toovey and Jean Rayner, 14, in  front of the Seven Feathers Club in Edenham Street, North Kensington. Ken Russell
In 1955, the fledgling photographer created a series called The Last of the Teddy Girls, which  featured photographs taken against the war-torn backdrop of London’s  East End. The images are one of the first reportage series to be made of  British youth culture, presenting pictures of working class girls in  Neo-Edwardian dress—a fascinating counterpoint to their drape-coated and  drainpipe-wearing male counterparts the Teddy Boy. The Last of the Teddy Girls also provided a rare and unique glimpse of a little recognized and under-documented subculture of austere post war Britain.

Elsie, 15, and Rose Hendon with Mary Toovey and Jean Rayner, 14, in front of the Seven Feathers Club in Edenham Street, North Kensington. Ken Russell

In 1955, the fledgling photographer created a series called The Last of the Teddy Girls, which featured photographs taken against the war-torn backdrop of London’s East End. The images are one of the first reportage series to be made of British youth culture, presenting pictures of working class girls in Neo-Edwardian dress—a fascinating counterpoint to their drape-coated and drainpipe-wearing male counterparts the Teddy Boy. The Last of the Teddy Girls also provided a rare and unique glimpse of a little recognized and under-documented subculture of austere post war Britain.

(Source: aprairiehomecomrade)